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redesigned website

After a lot of hard work with EyeMotion, our website company, we’re pleased to be launching our brand-new website.  Our goal has been to create a site that would assist you in learning about us, whether it’s finding our location or email form, reading about our wonderful eye doctors, or discovering some of our quality products and services.

Have questions about an eye issue?  We think you might also benefit from our great optometric content on eye diseases and conditions.

Our plan is to use this area to keep you informed on new offerings, sales, trunk shows, events, and so much more.  Check back here from time to time to keep updated.

We’re glad you found us, and we hope to see you soon!

Can Wiley X eyewear stand up to a blast from a 20-gauge shotgun? See for yourself.

Can a pair of Wiley X sunglasses survive multiple blows from a hammer? You decide.

Inspired by the beauty and culture of Maui, our mission is to spread aloha through vivid color, clarity, and detail. 

For those who appreciate the sun, Maui Jim provides more vibrant colors of the world while protecting your eyes from the harsh effects of glare and harmful rays. 

We make your life brighter so you see the colors of your world at their best and always feel confident in your style.  

Maui Jim believes color and light are the key to human experience. Our sunglasses show you its full spectrum, so you can see the world like you’ve never seen. We believe everyone should experience all 16,777,216 hues of beautiful color that surrounds us every day. 

AT MAUI JIM, WE ALWAYS SHOW OUR TRUE COLORS AND GIVE YOU A BRIGHTER OUTLOOK ON LIFE. OUR SUNGLASSES ARE DESIGNED TO CHANGE THE WAY YOU SEE THE WORLD

Maui is one of the lushest, most vibrant places on earth. Yet its intense sunlight creates conditions that hide the beauty of the island. That’s why PolarizedPlus2® technology goes beyond shielding your eyes from glare and harmful UV to reveal and enhance the world’s true vivid colors in detail.

The iconic Carrera Captain, brought to life for the 21st Century. Forever bold. Forever original.

The colored part of the eye is called the iris. It is composed of two muscles. The constrictor and the dilator. The black circle at the center of the iris is called the pupil and is actually just an opening to allow light into the eye. The pupil appears black because the inside of the eye contains pigment to absorb all of the light that enters it, not allowing any of it to reflect back out.

When light enters your eye there is a muscular reflex in your iris to regulate the amount of light that hits the retina. Too much light and constrict muscles tighten to making your pupil smaller to limit the amount of light entering your eye. Not enough light and the dilator muscles contract allowing your pupil to get bigger.

During a comprehension eye exam, your eye doctor might want to dilate your pupils to evaluate the back of each eye under high magnification. Without dilation, the bright exam light automatically causes your pupils to constrict, making a much smaller opening to look through.

Dilating drops cause your pupils to enlarge by inhibiting the constrictor muscles from reacting to light., then the doctor can use a bright exam light combine with a magnification lens for an unobstructed view of the internal structure of each eye, including the retina, macula and optic discs.

Dilation drops typically cause blurred near-vision and light sensitivity lasting about 4 to 6 hours. Sunglasses are usually worn afterward to relieve glare discomfort, but you should be safe to drive with caution.

Keratoconus is an eye disease in which the cornea deforms from its normally curved dome shaped and becomes cone shaped. Sometimes there is a flaw in the collagen, the material of the cornea that weakens and allows the cornea to stretch into an irregular cone shape.

The cornea is the clear tissue located at the front of the eye and it refracts and focuses light as it enters the eye. Therefore abnormalities of the corneal surfaces can severely distort vision.

Symptoms usually start in the teen years with near-sighteness and astigmatism which can often be treated with contact lenses or glasses. At the onset it can be difficult to detect.

It is first diagnosed when the cornea starts reveal progressive irregular distortion and eventually becomes to advance for conventional glasses or contact lenses to correct. At this critical point it is often treated with specially designed contact lenses to provide a smooth optical surface to focus light rays and impede progression of the bulging cone shape.

In some case keratoconus can progress to the point that corneal replacement surgery is needed. This usually occurs around the age of 35.

There are some evidence to suggest allergy suffers and people with rigid contact lenses that rub their eyes may contribute to the progression of the symptoms and cause scratches on the surface of the cornea.

If you feel you are at risk or your prescription is changing rapidly make certain your eye care professional checks for Keratoconus during your next eye health and visual examination.

More people than ever before are consulting their eye doctors about eye strain while viewing things up close for fairly prolong periods amount of time. And it is not only adult office workers, but the young are now complaining vision problems from working on computers, using hand held devices and texting on their cell phones.

If you spend a fair amount of time looking at a digital device screen you would most likely most benefit from specially designed reading glasses or possibly computer glasses. Prescription reading glasses are designed to focus at a certain distance up close and can be prescribed for any age to help enhanced reading comfort.

On the other hand, computer glasses maybe a better choice for adults. Computer glasses provide multiple focal lengths which allow users to focus at multiple ranges within lengths arms reach. This kind of versatility can reduce computer eye strain while enhancing concentration.

Before your next eye appointment you will need to measure the distance from the bridge of your nose to the screen for all of the devices that you typically use. Take that list with you to your next eye doctor appointment.

If you are a good candidate, your eye doctor can utilize this list to prescribe personalized reading glasses or computer glasses to relieve eye strain associated with close range viewing.

Why Are Eye Exams Important?

Regardless of your age or physical health, it’s important to have regular eye exams.

During a complete eye exam, your eye doctor will not only determine your prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses, but will also check your eyes for common eye diseases, assess how your eyes work together as a team and evaluate your eyes as an indicator of your overall health.

For more information on the importance of eye exams visit AllAboutVision.com.

Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in the United States. Diabetes is a disease that effects blood vessels throughout the body including the eye. Some of the smallest and most delicate blood vessels in our body are found in the retina. Therefore they are some of the first ones affected by poor blood sugar control.

With diabetes, the blood vessels walls get damaged by chemical reactions caused by high sugar levels in the blood. Blood vessel walls can bulge and then leak causing swelling and hemorrhaging in the eye.

With proper care, diabetic eye disease can be controled allowing vision to be maintained. When diabetic patients fail to take care of their disease and it affects the eyes there can be permenant damage such as decreased vision and even blindness.

Some diabetics never have any eye issues and some have many eye problems. Each patient is different. Fortunately your eye care professional can detect and monitor eye damage and vision changes caused by diabetes.
The good news is there are new and improved medical treatments for those patients who do have diabetic eye disease. If you have diabetes you need to keep your sugar levels under control and have regular eye exams.

Make sure you get a yearly comprehensive eye exam by your eye care professional.

Maui Jim - Like You Have Never Seen

DAILIES TOTAL1®
WATER GRADIENT CONTACT LENSES

The world's first and only water gradient contact lenses.

In a survey, eye care professionals rated DAILIES TOTAL1® Contact Lenses highest in overall performance.1

TECHNOLOGY

The innovative design of DAILIES TOTAL1® contact lenses features a unique water gradient:

  • Approaching 100% water at the outermost surface provides a silky-smooth surface for comfort that lasts until the end of the day
  • 6 times more breathable than the leading daily disposable contact lens for white, healthy looking eyes

BENEFITS

  • Breakthrough design of DAILIES TOTAL1® water gradient contact lenses allows:
  • Exceptional comfort that lasts until the end of the day4††
  • Exceptional breathability* for white, healthy-looking eyes.3

RECOMMENDED FOR

  • People who want exceptional comfort until the end of the day.
  • People looking for a highly breathable* daily disposable contact lens, for white, healthy-looking eyes.3

 

* In vitro measurement of unworn lenses. ** High oxygen transmissible lenses; DAILIES TOTAL1® (delefilcon A) contact lenses: Dk/t = 156 @ -3.00D. Other factors may impact eye health. Ask your eye care professional for complete wear, care, and safety information.

References: 1. In a survey of 207 eye care professionals; Alcon data on file, 2014. 2. Angelini T, Nixon R, Dunn A, et al. Viscoelasticity and mesh-size at the surface of hydrogels characterized with microrheology. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013;54:E-abstract 500. 3. In a clinical study with 80 patients; Alcon data on file, 2011.
4. Based on the ratio of lens oxygen transmissibilities; Alcon data on file, 2010.

For more detailed information you can view the following:
DAILIES® AquaComfort Plus® Package Insert, DAILIES® AquaComfort Plus® Patient Instruction Booklet,
DAILIES® AquaComfort Plus® Professional Fitting Guide, DAILIES TOTAL1® Package Insert,
DAILIES TOTAL1® Patient Instruction Booklet and DAILIES TOTAL1® Professional Fitting Guide

© 2014 Novartis

 Ask your eye care professional for wear, care, and safety information

†Eye exam may be required. Professional fees may apply. At participating offices.
DAILIES® AquaComfort Plus®, DAILIES® AquaComfort Plus® Toric, DAILIES® AquaComfort Plus® Multifocal and the Alcon® logo are trademarks of Novartis AG.

The bio-microscope and the slit lamp form a two part instrument that your eye doctor uses during a comprehensive eye exam to view both the anterior or front portion of your eye and your eye lids at high magnification. The slit lamp uses a high intensity light source to illuminate the front of your eye or lids. The width of the beam is adjustable from a full beam to a thin slit of light, enabling the doctor to better evaluate the health of your eyes.

The bio-microscope is basically a stereo microscope tilted forward to look at the lids and lashes and the front of your eye. With dilation solution and special hand held lenses, your doctor can focus on the back of your eye as well, to view the retina internal structures.

Your doctor might also apply orange fluorescein eye drops and use a cobalt blue filter on the slit lamp. The die, injunction with the blue light, enables your eye doctor to better see any imperfections on the cornea, white of the eye and the lids. These imperfections may include signs of dryness, scratches, infections or eye injuries.  

Blepharitis is a common problem for both children and adults. It is an inflammation that affects the eyelids and eyelashes and can be brought on by bacterial infections, poor eyelid hygiene, excessive oil production and allergic reactions. There are two types of blepharitis; anterior and posterior.

Anterior blepharitis affects the front of the eyelids where the eyelashes attach. It is caused by bacteria or dandruff from the scalp. Symptoms include redness of eyelids, itching, irritation and a crusty build up on the eyelid.

Posterior blepharitis affects the inner eyelid and is caused by a problem with the oil gland within the eyelid. It is characterized by redness and swelling of the eyelid, along with itching, burning, tearing and irritation.

Blepharitis can be treated in a variety of ways including cleaning and massaging eyelids, applying a warm compress and antibiotics. However, long term effects can cause problems, so it is important to consult with your eye care provider.

Looking for the perfect sunglasses? If you drive or spend time outdoors, polarized lenses can give you clearer vision by enhancing contrast and eliminating glare.

Glare is caused when light bounces off a smooth surface. Problems from glare range from annoyance to eye strain to temporary blindness.

Light vibrates along all axis. But when light strikes a reflecting object, such as water or a highway, a high percent of light waves bounce off in similar horizontal angles.

Polarized lenses contain microscopic vertical lines that effectively cancel out the horizontal waves—thereby reducing glare.

Select a pair of polarized glasses from the display rack. Find a bright glare on the floor, or tabletop. Next, look at the glare through the glasses. The glare is gone. Rotate the glasses sideways while looking at the same glare. Now rotate back. You can clearly see the difference.

By reducing glare, polarized sunglasses will prevent strong light from damaging your eyes, reduce your eye strain, and improve the way you perceive colors and contrast.

A refractive error occurs when light is not focused properly on the retina at the back of the eye.

The curved surface of the eyeball bends light, much like a magnifying glass. This is called refraction. As the light is refracted it should focus on the retina, which lines the back surface of the eye.

Light enters your eye through two curved surfaces. First it passes through the cornea where most of the focusing occurs. Next, the lens, slightly adjusts the light to focus on the retina.

If the light focuses ahead of the retina, the eye is nearsighted or myopic. If the light focuses behind the retina, it is farsighted, or hyperopic. Astigmatism can result when the eye is unevenly rounded. Imperfections of the cornea or lens can also cause Astigmatism.

Glasses and contact lenses are made to bend light at a precise angle to offset the error that occurs in your eye. Surgery and corneal molding may also be options for the correction of refractive errors.

Please consult your eye care professional to discuss the solution that is best for you.

To remove your contact lenses, first wash your hands with soap and water and then dry them with a lint free towel. Then, making sure that your lens is centered on your eye, gently pull down on the lower eyelid and eye lashes with the middle finger of your removal hand.

Next, secure your upper eyelid and lashes with the middle finger of your other hand and look up. Then, with the index finger of your removal hand, touch the edge of the contact lens and slide it down onto the white part of your eye, making sure not to touch the contact lens with your fingernail.

Next, gently squeeze the lens with your thumb and index finger and remove. Repeat this process for your other eye and then store your contact lenses according to the procedure given to you by your eye care provider.

Once the contact lens is properly prepared it is time to insert the lens onto your eye.

First, using the middle finger from your non insertion hand, hold the upper eyelid and lashes open to help prevent blinking. Next, with the middle finger of your insertion hand, pull down on your lower eyelid and lashes to open your eye as much as possible. Then, while looking forward, gently place the contact on the front of your eye.

Look left, right and down to center the lens and then gently release your eyelids and blink to further center the contact lens. If the contact is still not centered properly, close your eye and gently massage the lens until the contact is in place.

Repeat this process for your other eye and your contact lenses will be inserted successfully.

Glaucoma, often referred to as “the silent thief of sight”, can occur with no warning signs, pain or symptoms. It affects 3 million people in the United States and has caused blindness in over 120,000 people. Glaucoma cannot be cured, but if detected early can be managed to limit its effects.

Glaucoma usually occurs when there is an increase of pressure within your eye, but can occur with normal eye pressure as well. This pressure causes damage to the optic nerve, which is the weakest part of your eye, leading to decreased peripheral vision and possibly blindness.

Your eye is divided into two chambers, the anterior chamber at the front of the eye, and the posterior chamber at the back. A fluid, called the aqueous humor, is produced by the cilliary body and circulates between the two chambers to clean and nourish your eye. Once it reaches the edge of your iris it leaves the eye through an opening called the trabecular meshwork.

With glaucoma, more fluid is produced than can be removed, which leads to an increase in pressure in the anterior chamber. Eventually the pressure throughout your eye increases, exerting force on the neural fibers of your optic nerve. Over time this causes damage to the optic nerve, which leads to partial or total vision loss.

There are a number of risk factors for glaucoma including age, ethnicity, family history, and certain medical disorders such as diabetes. If you are at a higher risk for glaucoma be sure and consult with your eye care provider regularly to increase your chance of early detection.

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Visit our new website!
February 12, 2018
After a lot of hard work with EyeMotion, our website company, we’re pleased to be launching our brand-new website.  Our goal has been to create a site that would assist you in learning about us, whether it’s finding our location or email form, reading about our wonderful eye doctors, or discovering some of our quality products and services. Have qu...
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